A Guide on When and How to Hire a Lawyer

As an attorney who practices primarily in criminal defense and family law, I often tell my friends and family that IĀ never want to see them in my office. Point being that, if you are seeking the advice of a criminal defense lawyer or family lawyer, something in your life has most likely gone wrong.

That being said, few ever anticipate being charged with a crime in advance of their arrest. In the same thread, few ever plan on getting divorced at the time they are exchanging vows.

Everyone has that family friend to call when they are in a bind. If their toilet backs up, they call their cousin’s friend who is a plumber. If their speakers go out, they call up their high school friend who works in electronics. Most likely, anyone reading this article has had a friend or family member hit them up for advice in their specialty.

Lawyers are no different. Every day, I get an unsolicited call or email from friends and family with various legal questions. Do I need to incorporate? What can I do if my neighbor’s dog keeps coming in my yard? My fiend owes me a hundred bucks and won’t pay. The list goes on and on.

The sad truth to hiring a lawyer is that most people don’t really know where to start. Sure, if you have a family friend practicing law, that is an easy call to make. However, what do you do if you don’t know anyone practicing law where you live? Or if you don’t know anyone in town that practices law?

To clear things up, I recently penned a piece for Primer MagazineĀ titled “When and How to Hire a Lawyer.” This piece is a straightforward guide to determine whether you need a lawyer, how to find a lawyer, and how you will end up paying that lawyer. Hopefully this piece can help you or someone you know navigate the complicated road towards legal representation.

Scott