Tennessee DUI: How do I get a SCRAM Bracelet Removed?

If you are arrested for a second or greater DUI in Tennessee and later bond out of jail, a judge can order you to wear an alcohol monitoring device, known as a SCRAM bracelet, around your ankle. We are often asked “how can I get the SCRAM bracelet removed?”

Tennessee DUI law requires that a court consider placing one of the following conditions on anyone who is arrested for a second or greater DUI and later bonds out of jail:

  1. The use of ignition interlock devices;
  2. The use of transdermal monitoring devices or other alternative alcohol monitoring devices;
  3. The use of electronic monitoring with random alcohol or drug testing; or
  4. Pretrial residency in an in-patient alcohol or drug rehabilitation center.

The most common condition given to someone who bonds out of jail for a DUI is the use of an alcohol monitoring device. However, you can have this device removed if you complete one of the other conditions that courts can apply.

For example, if you check yourself into in-patient alcohol or drug treatment, then the alcohol monitoring device can be removed. Another instance where the alcohol monitoring device can be removed is if you install an ignition interlock device on your vehicle.

In short, a criminal defense attorney can file the required Motion and Order to have your SCRAM bracelet removed, so long as you complete one of the other conditions required by law. Ask a criminal defense lawyer how they can help.

Community Celebrates Murfreesboro Law Office Opening

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

MURFREESBORO, TN, June 10, 2015

On Monday, Murfreesboro residents gathered to celebrate the opening of the Law Office of W. Scott Kimberly, which opened its doors earlier this year. Local attorney Scott Kimberly discussed his vision for the future of the office with those in attendance.

“I’m thrilled to open this office,” said Kimberly, “and I’m humbled by the support of those who showed up to celebrate today. Lord willing, I look forward to many years of practice here on the Murfreesboro Public Square.”

Kimberly has practiced law on the Murfreesboro Public Square for several years, recently leaving a partnership to open his own office.

Kimberly is involved in various organizations and associations throughout Rutherford County, including the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce, Murfreesboro Young Professionals, and the Rutherford Cannon County Bar Association.

In recent months, Kimberly lectured at Middle Tennessee State University about constitutional rights and police interaction. Kimberly also recently spoke at the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce on the topic of professional development.

“We are excited about being part of Scott Kimberly’s grand opening,” said Kelli Beam, Membership Director of the Rutherford County Chamber of Commerce. “Scott is very involved in the chamber and other organizations in the community, which I believe has helped open so many doors and has given him the opportunity to open his own office.”

The Law Office of W. Scott Kimberly is located in the Historic 107 North Maple Street Building on the Murfreesboro Public Square. For more information, call 615-890-1099 or visit murfreesborolawyer.com.

Scott Kimberly
Attorney at Law
615-890-1099
http://www.murfreesborolawyer.com

Divorce: Quality Experiences with Children as a Low Income Spouse

Financial Security Without Collateral Damage to Children
Unfortunately, kids are often collateral damage in a divorce. Divorcing parents are concerned with how often they will see their children. However, they are also concerned with the financial result of divorce. Under the child support guidelines, the number of days spent with the kids directly impacts the child support award to be paid, which leads to an uncomfortable situation where both parents are fighting for more time with the kids and neither parent’s motive is clear.

When you throw in the emotional impact of divorce, and the fact that each parent may be fueled to gain an upper hand on the other in the divorce, the fight over the kids can become poisonous.

Providing Quality Experiences as a Low Income Parent
The most important step towards making sure that both parents can afford to have quality experiences with the kids after divorce is to fight for every cent of financial support. This includes both spousal support, which is sometimes called alimony, and child support.

In a situation where the Father is the high income earner, but the Mother has more time with the kids, the Father may want to be the “fun parent,” who takes his children on weekend trips and theme park vacations. The Mother may feel forced into being the “serious parent,” who handles the weekday responsibilities of housework, homework, and school events. Naturally, the lower income parent in this situation is going to feel limited in the ability to have quality experiences with the kids.

The primary check against a high income parent using a lot of money to have more quality experiences with the children than the low income parent is the court, who will award the low income parent a certain portion of the high income parent’s income to provide for the children.

The lower income parent needs to make sure that the court knows the income and earning potential of the higher income parent. If the higher income parent’s income is accurate, then the lower income parent should receive some kind of financial assistance, which will allow both parents to have quality experiences with the kids.

How to Avoid Revenge Debt During Divorce

Tina Orem with Credit Card Guide wrote an article that provides Seven Steps to Avoid Revenge Debt During Divorce. I was fortunate enough to chat with Ms. Orem and be quoted in the article.

In Murfreesboro, Divorce is often contested. When one spouse decides to end a marriage, he or she will file for divorce in Rutherford County, but what happens to the marital money during the divorce?

Often, people find themselves in a situation where a divorce action has been filed but they are technically still married. This may lead to a problem that some call revenge debt.

Revenge debt, in the divorce world, is the term used to describe a situation where one spouse takes out debt in the other spouse’s name in retaliation for filing for divorce or for other behavior. Unfortunately, since the parties are still legally married, one spouse may be able to do that.

If you are contemplating divorce, or have filed for divorce, what are some practical steps you can take to prevent what some call revenge debt?

In short, the best advice can be boiled down to two points: be proactive and be preemptive. However, Ms. Orem interviewed several lawyers in the article, from all across the country, and put together the best advice and tips. Give it a read!

Several of these principles apply in Tennessee Divorce. However, every case is different. If you are facing divorce in Murfreesboro or Rutherford County and are worried about your spouse taking out revenge debt against you, give me a call and we can discuss your options and how you can protect yourself from revenge debt.

Tennessee Marijuana Laws: Is Change in the Future?

This is a guest post from Texas Criminal Defense Attorney Andrew Deegan. Andrew is an author and frequent contributor on criminal defense topics. Read more about Andrew on his website. The views and opinions of author expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of this law office.

Like so many other issues, there is still a deep divide in the nation regarding marijuana laws. I practice law in Texas. In Tennessee, just like Texas, possession of marijuana will get you arrested and charged. In other states, including Washington and Colorado, marijuana is fully legalized.

Recent Changes
The District of Columbia just legalized marijuana, allowing anyone in the small federal brainstem of our country, where our highest levels of federal government sit, to freely consume marijuana. It’s a remarkable shift in national attitudes toward this notorious plant that was not too long ago penalized harshly on both federal and state levels.

This is part of a greater trend over the last several years that started with states such as Colorado and Washington moving toward full legalization. Oregon did the same last year, and other states are likely to follow.

There are many reasons for this shift. Proponents of marijuana believe it is not only medically beneficial, but recreationally harmless. Proponents also point out the vast resources spent on jailing and prosecuting people for simple possession of marijuana and how those resources could be used elsewhere.

Obviously, some states strongly disagree. Nebraska and Oklahoma, for instance, sued the State of Colorado in federal court to prevent their legalization on the grounds that it violates the Supremacy Clause of the U.S. Constitution.

Marijuana Laws in Tennessee
Possession of marijuana is still aggressively prosecuted in Tennessee, across the South, and in other conservative states, including my home state of Texas. For residents of Middle Tennessee, simple possession of marijuana will still get you arrested and charged.

Tennessee has harsher possession penalties for marijuana crimes than Texas. In Tennessee, marijuana possession of more than half of an ounce is a felony, while marijuana possession of less than half an ounce is a misdemeanor. In Texas, you need to have more than four ounces to be charged with felony possession of marijuana.

Throughout the South, including Tennessee, Texas, and other states, there are still punitive marijuana laws that likely will not be swept up in the recent wave of change.

Despite this, economic incentives to legalizing marijuana are starting to move the needle, especially in bigger cities. In order to keep costs down, big counties like Dallas County, near where I practice, have considered no longer arresting people for amounts under two ounces to keep costs down.

Will Tennessee and Texas ultimately move toward legalization of marijuana? I think that it will happen eventually and that the economic incentives to legalize marijuana and tax it will eventually prevail. However, I don’t think it’s likely to happen anytime soon. What do you think?